Joseph KNIBBS, son of James KNIBBS and Elizabeth PANTING , was born December 1812 in Old Windsor, Berkshire, England. He married Mary Ann LILLY bef. 1837. He died bet. October and December, 1849 in Old Windsor District, Berkshire, England. Mary Ann LILLY was born abt. 1815 in Bow, Devonshire, England. She died 12 January 1883 in Newington Butts, Southwark, Surrey, England.


Children of Joseph KNIBBS and Mary Ann LILLY are:
1. Joseph KNIBBS, b. abt. 1836
2. John KNIBBS, b. abt. 1837 See John KNIBBS & Sarah BATCHELOR
3. James KNIBBS, b. bet. July and September, 1839
4. Elizabeth KNIBBS, b. abt. 1834 See William PALEY & Elizabeth KNIBBS OR Edward HOARE & Elizabeth KNIBBS
5. Mary Ann KNIBBS, b. abt. 1842 See Richard William PHILLIPS & Mary Ann KNIBBS
6. Richard KNIBBS, b. abt. 1847
7. Jemima KNIBBS, b. bet. July and September, 1844
8. Sarah KNIBBS, b. bet. January and March, 1843 See ? & Sarah KNIBBS
9. Frances KNIBBS, b. bet. April and June, 1846 See George BRYAN & Frances KNIBBS OR James SMITH & Frances KNIBBS
10. Emily KNIBBS, b. 1849

Notes for Joseph KNIBBS:

The IGI has record of his baptism at Old Windsor on 26 Dec 1812, the son of James and Elizabeth Nibbs. He was baptised the same day as his twin brother John. It's the record of the baptism that links Joseph and John with this James and Elizabeth Knibbs who we know disappeard from Woodstock, Oxfordshire after 1800.
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See Joseph's Baptism Registration

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The 1841 census shows Joseph, his wife and children, living in the household of Mary's parents, John Lilly aged 60, and Anne Lilly aged 55 at Bishopsgate Common in the parish of Egham, Surrey:
Joseph Knibbs 26 Ag Lab (born out of County)
Mary Knibbs 23 (born out of County)
Elizabeth Knibbs 7 (born in Surrey)
Joseph Knibbs 6 (born in Surrey)
John Knibbs 3 (born in Surrey)
James Knibbs 2 (born in Surrey)
Mary Knibbs 1 month (born in Surrey)
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From the Windsor and Eton Express - 31 January 1852:
APPEAL CASE.—OLD WINDSOR V, NEW WINDSOR.
This was an appeal against the removal of five children named Knibbs from the parish of New Windsor to Old Windsor. The family had been previously removed from New Windsor to Egham, and the order was quashed at Quarter Sessions. Mr. Lawrence (instructed Mr. Seeker) appeared for the appellants, and Mr. Huddlestone (instructed by Mr. Millos) appeared for the respondents.
Mr. Robert Reeve Smyth deposed that he served notice of appeal on the parish officers of New Windsor on the 13th of October, 1851; he also served the grounds of appeal in January.
Cross-examined by Mr. Huddlestone: The grounds of removal, and order, were sent by post to the overseers of Old Windsor on the 11th of September, 1851. Application was made for the depositions within 31 days after the order of removal, but could not recollect tbe exact date. Now found, on reference, that the application was made to Mr. Long, the clerk to the removing justices, on the 29tb of September, 1851.
Re-examined by Mr. Lawrence: It was on tbe 29th of September that application was made to Mr. Long’s clerk for a copy of the depositions.
By Mr. Huddlestone: The order of removal was brought to witness on the 11th of September, by Mr. Cole, one of the overseers of Old Windsor.
The Recorder said be did not see the bearing of the queations put by Mr. Huddlestone.
Mr. Huddleatone said the Act of Parliament provided that the appellant parish should give notice of appeal within 21 days after the order of removal was made.
Mr. Lawrence said the order was dated on the 10th of September.
Mr. HuJdlestone said, that being the case, he would waive his objection. He would now ask whether his learned friend was in time—whether the appeal ought not to have been tried last Sessions. The Recorder ruled that the appellants were in time. Were he to do otherwise, he should say that his predecessor in the Recorder’s seat had done wrong.
Mr. Huddlestone next objected that the notice of appeal did not appear to be signed by a majority of the parish officers. He should not have taken this objection, but he saw that a very wicked objection was about to be taken by the other side to the notice of chargeability, and it was sport to see the engineer hoist on his own petard" (laughter). The notice was signed by two churchwardens and two overseers of the parish of Old Windsor. The Act said the notice should be signed by a majority of the churchwardens or overseers. The notice on the face of it did not show that it was signed by a majority either of the churchwardens or overseers. The learned gentleman cited cases in support of his argument.
At the conclusion of his speech Mr. Huddlestone asked Mr. Smyth how many churchwardens and how many overseers there were in Old Windsor, and receiving for answer that the notice was signed by the whole of the officers, his objection fell to the ground.
Mr. Lawrence called upon Mr. Huddlestone to prove the notice of cbargeablity upon which the order of removal was grounded.
Mr. Huddlestone argued that he could not be called upon to prove the notice, and cited cases to shew that the onus of proving the notice to be unduly executed rested with the appellants.
The notice of chargeability was then put in.
Mr. A. F. Millus deposed that there were four overseers and three churchwardens in the parish of New Windsor.
The notice was signed by three churchwardens and one overseer.
A long and uninteresting legal discussion took place on this objection, Mr. Lawrence urging that the assistant-overseer was an overseer for the purposes of the Act, and Mr. Hudlestone contra.
The Recorder decided that the assistant-overseer was not an “over seer" within the meaning of the Act.
Mr. Lawrence still disputed the notice of chargeability, and calle
Mr. John Burgiss Brown, who deposed that he was appointed churchwarden on the 21st of April, 1851, and that he signed the notice produced the 10th of September in the same year.
Mr. Lawrence said his objection was that Mr. Brown, at the time signed the notice, had not been sworn in at churchwarden before the archdeacon.
The Recorder said Mr. Brown being churchwarden de facto would do.
Mr. Lawrence said all the authorities showed that the old churchwarden continued in office until his successor bad been aworn in. That being the case, the notice was not signed by a majority of the parish officer
Mr. Huddlestone said the ground of appeal stated that the notice of chargeability was bad on the face of it. Such was clearly not the cas
The Recorder decided that the notice not bad on the face thereof," and overruled the objection.
Mr. Huddlestone then stated the case. The five paupers were the children of Joseph and Mary Ann Knibbs. Joseph Knibbs was born at Old Windsor in 1812—about forty years ago—and this fact gave him a prima facie standing. Mr. Lawrence said he admitted the birth of Joseph Knibbs at Old Windsor, but be should be able show that be was the son of a man whose settlement, by hiring, was at the parish of Steeple Claydon, in Oxfordshire. In 1828, the daughter of Knibbs, the father, was removed to Steeple Aston from Old Windsor, and the removal was not appealed against. That fact would conclude the settlement of the family, and fix it at Steeple Asto
Mr. Huddlestone said the order of removal of the sister of Joseph Knibbs to Steeple Aston, as the settlement of her father James Knibbs, would be conclusive against Sarah Knibbs's children, but would not be so against Joseph Knibbs, because he was emancipated by marriage, afterward
The Recorder said, emancipated or not, Joseph Knibbs would follow the birth-settlement of his father. He should hold the ground of appeal to be sufficient.
Mr. Lawrence said he should be compelled to give secondary evidence of the order of removal.
Mr. Charles Thomas Phillips, solicitor, of Windsor, deposed that he had searched for papers in the office of the clerk to the justices for Berks. He searched the file for 1828.
Mr. Huddlestone objected that the clerk to the justices should have been called.
Mr. Phillips further deposed that he found no order or duplicate of an order for the removal of Sarah Knibbs. Had also searched the parish chest at Old Windsor, and found no order. Searched also a cupboard in the vestry of Old Windsor, but found no such order. Searched also in the pariah chest of Steeple Aston, but found order. Ascertained who were the overseers of Steeple Aston, in 1828. Examined the papers in the hands of the vestry-clerk, but found no order.
Cross-examined by Mr. Huddlestonr: Searched in the office of clerk to the justices of Berks—the office of Mr. Seeker, in Windsor.
Mr. George Deodatus Warcus deposed that he resided in Huddersfield. In 1828, was acting as assistant-overseer to Mr. Sivewright. James Knibbs worked for Lord Ashbrook, and his daughter Sarah Knibbs, being pregnant, was examined to her settlement. Was not present at her examination. Took her to Steeple Aston, under an order of removal.
Mr. Huddlestons argued that the order of removal must be produced.
The Recorder said Mr. Lawrence could ask who gave witness the order to remove Sarah Koibbs.
Mr. Huddlestone said such evidence would not affect his clients. New Windsor would not be affected by what Old Windsor did. Nothing but an order—and a valid order—would affect the respondents. The almost certainty was that the order, if produced, would be found to be invalid.
Mr. Warcus further deposed that he received his orders from Mr. Sheppard, who was the assistant-overseer of Old Windsor. Witness. delivered Sarah Knibbs to the parish officers of Steeple Aston. Witness was afterwards overseer for Old Windsor, and Sarah Knibbs returned to the parish, but never became chargeable.
Mr. Lawrence said that would be the case for the appellants.
Mr. Huddlestone contended that no case had been made out. No evidence as to the settlement of Joseph Kiiiihs had been given.
The Recorder said if Mr Lawrence had no further evidence to offer it would be insufficient. The settlement might have been gained by Sarah Knibbs, by a year's service in a farm-house at Steeple Aston.
Mr Lawrence was proceeding to reopen the case when—
The Recorder said they had certainly had a very patient and a very acute enquiry, and the result was that the order of removal must be confirmed.
Mr. Huddlestone applied for costs, on the part of the respondents. The Recorder said it was a very fair case for enquiry, and he should give the usual costs.

Sources for Joseph KNIBBS:

  1. FreeBMD, as NIBBS 
  2. LDS IGI Records, as NIBBS 
  3. Alan Jackson, NBI,
  4. 1841 British Census,

Notes for Mary Ann LILLY:

From the Windsor and Eton Express, Saturday 13 September 1851:
BERKS PETTY SESSIONS: An order was made for removal of Mary Ann, Sarah, Jemima, Frances and Emily Knibbs, from the parish of New Windsor to the parish of Old Windsor.


I don't know what this was related to but the children were all placed into the Windsor Union Workhouse, Old Windsor and were there at the time of the 1851 census. I wonder if perhaps they had been reunited with their mum, but this was an order for them to be sent back to the Old Windsor workhouse.
I believe at the tme, there were often debates as to which town or village had financial responsibiity for th eunfortunate individuals who were, often through no fault of their own, placed into the workhouse.
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We can see Mary as a widow in 1861 living at 119 Bedford Street, Mile End Old Town, Tower Hamlets, Middlesex with her daughter Elizabeth and son Richard:
Mary Ann Knibbs Widow 45 Laundress Bow Devonshire
Elizabeth Knibbs Daughter Unmarried 25 Egham Surrey
Richard Knibbs Son Scholar 14 London Middlesex
Sarah Foster Lodger 25 Needlewoman Hertford
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The 1871 census shows Mary Ann as a widow, living at Mile End Old Town, Tower Hamlets, Middlesex with supposedly, three daughters, a neice and a lodger:
Mary Ann Knibbs Widow 54 Lodging House Keeper Bow Devonshire
Jemima Knibbs Daughter single 24 Machinist Egham Surrey
Sarah Knibbs Daughter single 28 Laundress Egham Surrey
Emily Knibbs Daughter single 8 Mile End Middlesex
Jemima Knibbs Niece single 4 Mile End Middlesex
Anna Farmer Lodger Widow 52 Silk Weaver Shoreditch Middlesex

We believe that Emily is not the daughter of Mary Ann, but the daughter of Mary Ann's daughter Sarah.
We know that another of Mary Ann's daughters, Elizabeth, married a man named Edward Hoare and went off to live in America in 1871, and was joined there in about 1880 by Emily Knibbs, aged 16, who is described at that time as her neice. I believe that was the Emily listed here in 1871.

Jemima is probably the daughter of Mary Ann's own daughter, Frances Knibbs, so a grand-daughter rather than a neice as identified on the census return.
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In 1881 Mary is living with her daughter Mary and son-in-law at 3 Dante Rd., Newington, Surrey, England:
Richard Phillips Head Mar 38 Fish Salesman Master Employing 2 Men Whitechapel Middlesex
Mary A Phillips Wife Mar 40 Bishopsgate Middlesex
Richard C Phillips Son 2 Newington Surrey
Mary A Knibbs Mother Wid 64 Income From Freeholds Bow Devon
Jemima Knibbs Niece 14 No Occupation Mile End Middlesex
Alfred Sharp Lodger Wid Male 62 Retired Oilman Whitechapel MiddlesexRetired Oilman
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19 May 1883 - The Will of Mary Ann Knibbs formerly of 3 Dante-road Newington Butts but late of 27 Penton-place Newington Butts in the County of Surrey widow who died 12 January 1883 at 27 Penton-place was approved at the Principal Registry by Mary Ann Phillips of 27 Penton-place Widow the Daughter the soul Executrix.

Sources for Mary Ann LILLY:

  1. Alan Jackson, gave surname 
  2. 1841 British Census,
  3. 1871 British Census,
  4. FreeBMD,
  5. Ancestry.com. - England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966,
  6. 1861 British Census,

Notes for Joseph KNIBBS:

In 1851 we can see Joseph and 6 of his siblings at the Windsor Union Workhouse, Old Windsor.
Joseph Knibbs Pauper 15 Plasterer Hawke Boy Surrey Egham
John Knibbs Pauper 13 Shepherd Boy Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Mary Ann Knibbs Pauper 8 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Sarah Knibbs Pauper 6 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Emily Knibbs Pauper 2 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Jemima Knibbs Pauper 4 Deserted Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Frances Knibbs Pauper 3 Deserted Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
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Joseph died of fever in Crimea aboard the hospital ship Gomelza..
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Armagh Guardian - Friday 02 March 1855:
ON BOARD THE GOMELZA. Private James Junes, 49th Regt, dysentery, Jan 24. Corporal Holden, do, do, Jan 24. 3,952 Privates Joseph Woods, Scot/ Fusilier Gds, do, Feb. 25. 3,442 Chas Taywell, 97th Regt, do, Jan 25. 3,087 Jesse Evans, 55th Regt, do, Jan 27. Henry Woods, Scots Fusilier Gds, do, Jan 28. John Flannery, 6th Dragoons, do, Jan 28. 3,401, John Wright, Scots Fusilier, Gds, febris, Feb 1. 3,505 Lorrimer, 56th Regt, dysentery and scorb, Feb 1. 3,658, James Woods Scots Fusileer Gds, do, Feb 2. 3,221, Joseph Knibbs 97th Regt, febris, Feb 2.

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See a record of Joseph's military service

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Note: A brief summary of conditions on the Hospital ships of the time:
The distance between Balaclava and Scutari is 300 miles. In fair weather the faster steamships could make the passage under two days. Breakdowns were not uncommon and stormy or foggy conditions were increasingly troublesome. Most of the requisitioned merchant ships were in steam but a few were in sail and inevitably, were slow. In December the small sailing vessel 'Gomelza' took six days on the passage. Between September and October some 40 different ships were used and clearly it had not been possible to carry out conversions on all of these to provide facilities even approaching those of efficient hospital ships. There were few refinements for the comfort of the patients. They had to lie on the decks, sometimes on a mattress or palliasse, but seldom in a bed. There was no special area where operations could be performed; in most instances the doctors had to treat patients where they lay in crowded, dark, and noisome conditions. Up to December the medical staff was largely provided by the army. Some ships with more than 300 sick or wounded carried only two assistant-surgeons, newly recruited; a few had four doctors. Occasionally naval medical officers were loaned from the Fleet. In some ships the doctor originally on board remained to help in a civilian capacity. When large numbers of wounded were carried.

Sources for Joseph KNIBBS:

  1. 1841 British Census,
  2. Ancestry.co.uk - Canada, British Regimental Registers of Service, 1756-1900,
  3. Ancestry.co.uk - Surrey, England, Baptisms, 1813-1912,

Notes for James KNIBBS:

James died aged 3 years and 6 months.

Sources for James KNIBBS:

  1. 1841 British Census, gave Surrey as place of birth 
  2. FreeBMD,
  3. Ancestry.co.uk - Surrey, England, Burials, 1813-1987,

Notes for Richard KNIBBS:

Sources for Richard KNIBBS:

  1. 1861 British Census,

Notes for Jemima KNIBBS:

In 1851 we can see Jemima and 6 of her siblings at the Windsor Union Workhouse, Old Windsor.
Joseph Knibbs Pauper 15 Plasterer Hawke Boy Surrey Egham
John Knibbs Pauper 13 Shepherd Boy Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Mary Ann Knibbs Pauper 8 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Sarah Knibbs Pauper 6 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Emily Knibbs Pauper 2 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Jemima Knibbs Pauper 4 Deserted Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Frances Knibbs Pauper 3 Deserted Surrey Bishopsgate Egham

Sources for Jemima KNIBBS:

  1. 1871 British Census, says Egham Surrey for birth 
  2. FreeBMD,

Notes for Emily KNIBBS:

In 1851 we can see Emily and 6 of her siblings at the Windsor Union Workhouse, Old Windsor.
Joseph Knibbs Pauper 15 Plasterer Hawke Boy Surrey Egham
John Knibbs Pauper 13 Shepherd Boy Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Mary Ann Knibbs Pauper 8 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Sarah Knibbs Pauper 6 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Emily Knibbs Pauper 2 Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Jemima Knibbs Pauper 4 Deserted Surrey Bishopsgate Egham
Frances Knibbs Pauper 3 Deserted Surrey Bishopsgate Egham

Sources for Emily KNIBBS:

  1. 1851 British Census,