Edward HOARE was born September 1840 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire, Wales. He married Elizabeth KNIBBS 27 February 1871 in Scarborough District, Yorkshire, England. He died 01 September 1913 in Windsor County, Vermont, USA. Elizabeth KNIBBS, daughter of Joseph KNIBBS and Mary Ann LILLY , was born abt. 1834 in Egham, Surrey, England. She died UNKNOWN.


Children of Edward HOARE and Elizabeth KNIBBS are:
1. Unknown HOARE, b. bet. 1871 and 1888

Marriage/Union Events for Edward HOARE\Elizabeth KNIBBS:

Other Marriages/Unions for Edward HOARE:
See Edward HOARE & Emily Vivian KNIBBS

Other Marriages/Unions for Elizabeth KNIBBS:
See William PALEY & Elizabeth KNIBBS


Notes for Edward HOARE:

Also known as: Major Edward Le Mesurier Hoare

We can see from the 1841 census return that Edward Hoare was born in Merthyr Tydfil in Glamorganshire, Wales where we can see him living with his parents and siblings in 1841:
Edward Hoare 30 Gardener
Mary Hoare 30
William Hoare 15
Thomas Hoare 4
Edward Hoare 9 months
Rachel Rees 20 FS
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In 1851, Edward was still living with his parents at Pedwranfach, Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire, Wales:
Edward Hoare Head Mar 43 Gardener and Seedsman Glamorgan Merthyr Tydfil
Mary Hoare Wife 42 Glamorgan Merthyr Tydfil
Edward Hoare Son 10 Scholar Glamorgan Merthyr Tydfil
Maryann Hoare Daur 8 Scholar Glamorgan Merthyr Tydfil
John James Son 2 Glamorgan Merthyr Tydfil
William Hoare Son 6 months Glamorgan Merthyr Tydfil
Margaret Lewis Servant UnM 22 House Maid Cardigan Mount

Edward employed 3 men and 1 female.
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In 1861, the family was living at Junction(?) Hotel, Loch Y Wain, Llanwonno, Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorganshire:
Edward Hoare Head Mar 53 Inkeeper and Farmer 3.5 acres Glamorgan Merthyr
Mary Hoare Wife 52 Glamorgan Merthyr
Edward Hoare Son 20 Railway Clerk Glamorgan Merthyr
Mary Ann Hoare Daur 18 Scholar Glamorgan Merthyr
John J Hoare Son 12 Scholar Glamorgan Merthyr
Margaret Lewis Serv UnM 33 House Servant Candiganshire
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In 1871, he was lodging at 24 Vincent Square on the corner of Alfred Street, Westminster, London, having recently married Elizabeth:
Job Toop Head M 50 Cabproprietor Dorset
Mary Ann Toop Wife M 46 Somerset Bridgewater
Mary Ann Toop Daur 12 Middlesex Knightsbridge
John Doyleaf Lodger M 50 Carpenter Middlesex London
Emma Doyleaf Wife M 46 Middlesex London
George Doyleaf Son 12 Middlesex Westminster
Edward Hoare Lodger M 32 Corporal Royal Engineers Wales Merthyr Tydfil
Elizabeth Hoare Wife M 36 Surrey Egham
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Edward married Elizbeth Knibbs (aka opera singer Lizzie Lemure) in 1871 and they went off together to live in Chicago, Illinois, USA. They separated after about 10 years and eventually divorced in 1888 due to Edward's infidelity with Emily Knibbs, identified in the divorce as his neice.
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We can see them in 1880, living at Jefferson, Cook, Illinois,:
Edward Hoar Head Mar 40 Wales
Elizabeth Hoar Wife Mar 47 England
Emily Clark Niece 17 England
Carrie Seymore Adopted Daughter 25 Canada

The original census return shows Carrie Seymore as an adopted daughter who was either widowed or divorced.
I suspect that the girl named as Emily Clark was quite probably Elizabeth's niece, Emily Knibbs, who later went on to have an affair with and then marry Edward Hoare.
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Edward divorced Elizabeth and married her neice Emily Knibbs in 1888.
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We can see Edward and Emily in 1900 with three children Edna, Darrette and Lilian, living at Bayonne City, New Jersey, USA. The census states that they'd been married for 20 years.
Edward Hoare Head born Sep 1840 59 Married (20 years) Wales Civil Engineer
Emily Hoare Wife born Apr 1863 37 Married (20 years) England
Edna Hoare Daughter born Aug 18 1881 Illinois
Darrette Hoare Daughter born Jun 1890 9 New Jersey at School
Lillian Hoare Daughter born Feb 1893 7 England at School

Edward stated that he had been in the United States since 1870, and that Emily had been there since 1879.
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Edward and the children were living at Elizabeth Ward 10, Union, New Jersey in 1910, but Edward identified himself as a widower.
In 1910 we see him living at Elizabeth Ward 10, Union, New Jersey
Edward Hoare 69, ENG/Wales - civil engineer, widowed
Edna Hoare 28, ILL - nurse
Dorette Hoare 19, NJ
Lillian Hoare 19 [17] NJ
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From the New York Times, September 4, 1913:
Major Edward Le M. Hoare.
Major Edward Le Mesurier Hoare, a consulting engineer, with offices at 30 Church Street, died on Monday at his home, 419 West 115th Street, of heart disease, in his seventy-third year. For many years he was consulting engineer of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad and had a wide reputation as a railroad engineer. Major Hoare was born in London and came to America as a young man. Three daughters survive him.

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Edward was a Private in the Briish Army when his first wife, Elizabeth Knibbs purchased his release but we see from his obituary in the New York Time, he assumed the rank of Major and the surname of Le Mesurier Hoare.
Also, in his daughter Dorette's wedding announcement in the New York Herald, Edward's name was given as Major Edward Le M. Hoare.
The record at Riverside Cemetery, Woodstock, Windsor County, Vermont shows him as Edward Le M. Witten Hoare, so an even more intriguing twist to his name.
His daughter Edna is also buried at Riverside Cemetery.
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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at
Find A Grave web site for recording the details, in memory of Edward.

Sources for Edward HOARE:

  1. FreeBMD,
  2. 1900 US Federal Census, gave month of September, 1840 
  3. Obituary,
  4. 1891 British Census,
  5. 1910 US Federal Census,

Notes for Elizabeth KNIBBS:

Also known as: Lizzie Lemure

Elizabeth's father died in 1849 and we can see that in 1851, all of her siblings were living at the Windsor Union Workhouse. Elizabeth was that little bit older so I presume that at 15 or 16 years of age, she was deemed to be old enough to make her own way in the world. Unfortunately, I can see no sign of her in 1851.

Elizabeth had a daughter named Elizabeth Paley Knibbs, b.1853 at St George in the East, Stepney, London. The father was William Paley. They didn't marry.

The birth register states that Elizabeth was living at the Workhouse at the time of the birth.
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On 2 Feb 1853, Elizabeth was admitted to the Raine Street Workhouse, St George in the East, Wapping, London. She was admitted on the order of her Master because she was pregnant. The records are a little confusing because the Workhouse records indicate that Elizabeth and her daughter (also Elizabeth) were admitted on 2 Feb 1853, yet the baptism record for the daughter says she was born on 2 July 1853.

The workhouse record also indicates that Elizbaeth was married on 9 Sep 1852, so was in fact married when she was admitted. There seems to be no record of a marriage in 1852.
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We can see Elizabeth in 1861 living at 119 Bedford Street, Mile End Old Town, Tower Hamlets, Middlesex with her mother and brother Richard:
Mary Ann Knibbs Widow 45 Laundress Bow Devonshire
Elizabeth Knibbs Daughter Unmarried 25 Egham Surrey
Richard Knibbs Son Scholar 14 London Middlesex
Sarah Foster Lodger 25 Needlewoman Hertford
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Newspaper articles show that Elizabeth performed as Lizzie Lemure at the following places during her career as a Serio-Comic:
Alexandra Hall, Peter Street, Manchester, England - August-November, 1870
Winchester Music Hall, Southwark Bridge Road, London, England - December 1869-June 1874

The Area Almanack and Annual from 1874, lists Lizzie as a Serio-Comic Singer.
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From The Era - Sunday 10 July 1870:

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From The Era - 17 July 1870:
BELFAST
SHAKESPEARE HOTEL. - (Proprietress, E. Grey.) - The attraction of two ballets a night, executed by the Sisters Howard and the "Can-Can" Troupe, prove sufficient to draw crowded houses. Mies Jenny Blanche (serio-comic) made her first appearance on Monday. Miss Lemure sings her rattling serio-comic effusions In taking style, and receives much applause. Mr M. P. Foster is a satisfactory performer, and is appreciated.

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Lizzie's name regularly appeared in "The Era Almanac" between 1868 and 1877 as a Serio-Comic or Serio-Comic Singer.
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Copies of newspaper cuttings have revealed that Elizabeth married Edward Hoare in 1871 at Scarborough, Yorkshire England. He was a Private in the British army, and she was an opera singer. They separated in 1880 after 9 years and eventually divorced in 1888. Elizabeth divorced Edward on the grounds of his adultery with her niece, Emily Knibbs.

Elizabeth and Edward Hoare went to live in Chicago, Illinois, USA, and in 1880, an Emily Knibbs (said to be her niece from England) went to live with them. We can see from newspaper cuttings related to Elizabeth's divorce from Edward, that she was a fairly wealthy woman.
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A playbill from 1867, featuring "Miss Lemure" at the McDonald's Music Hall, High Street, Hoxton, London
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An extract from the Rocky Mountain News (Denver Co.) 27 July, 1888:

HER FAITHLESS HUSBAND
CHICAGO, July 26. - Lizzie Lemure's life romance was told in Judge Baker's court to-day, and a sadder one is seldom recorded, even in divorce annals. Lizzie Lemure was a famous London opera singer, a protege of Lord George Paget, and as a friend and contemporary of Ada Isaacs Monken, the "Mazeppa" of Astley's theatre, she frequently met the Prince of Wales, and her mezzo-soprano voice was well-known to London opera goers. An artist's affections are proverbially erratic. Lizzie Lemure's were entrapped by the Adonis-like person of a private in the British army. There was nothing of Edward Hoare but his magnificent physical beauty and manly strength. In his red coat and "shako" me might have entrapped the heart of a better dowered bride than Lizzie Lemure. A private soldier's pay, however, makes him susceptible to any woman of means, and Lizzie Lemure had £8,000, so in 1870 Lizzie Lemure and Edward Hoare were married. The opera singer gave the soldier $130 to buy his discharge in the army, but she affirms that he did not spend it for that purpose. According to her statement, he deserted from the ranks and came to Chicago. She followed him in six months. With her money a house was purchased at Park Ridge and Mrs. Hoare's activity and energy procured for her husband the position of civil engineer on the Northwestern railroad, which position he has held for fourteen years. The couple's life was commonplace but happy in Park Ridge until eight years ago. In 1880, not having been blessed with children, Mrs. Hoare brought over from England her sixteen-year-old niece, Emily Knibbs. Emily was not pretty, but she was young and vivacious. "She lived with Mr. Hoare and myself as one of the family" said Mrs. Hoare, "and for a long time I was far from accepting that my husband could be so base as to betray her. It came like a peal of thunder out of a clear sky when Emily became the mother of a child. She tearfully told me who was the father. It was Mr. Hoare. I taxed him and he confessed. I was so overcome that I became ill, and when I could do so I took a trip to California. On my return I found that Mr. Hoare and my niece were living together at my house.. I ordered her out and in a week Mr. Hoare left also. He told me he did not love me any more. He said he was bound to provide for and protect Emily and her child. The brazen girl was ungrateful for all I had done for her. She took all my bric-a-brac and the hundred little articles I had collected in twenty years, but I never chided my husband for his infamy; I loved him very deeply." Mrs. Hoare buried her face in her hands and seemed to be going back in memory to the days of Lizzie Lemure and Ada Isaacs Monken and the Adonis soldier who captured the citadel of her heart.
"Did you give your husband any provocation for this treachery" enquired Mrs. Hoare's lawyer.
Mrs. Hoare arose from her seat with flashing eye and swelling breast. The question dried her eyes. She seemed to be on the tragic boards again as she said, with an intentionally and dramatic gesture that caused Judge Baker to look up in astonishment. "Provocation! Well, yes. If you call taking him to Paris and spending £500 on him in a single month; if you call giving him all of my £2,000 which I made on the stage and £550 left to me by my mother in England; if you call that provocation, why, then, I suppose I gave him provocation. I loved him passionately. I was as true to him as any woman ever was to any man. Everything I had he got. He has absorbed it all, and to-day in the meridian of life I find myself heartbroken and penniless, with nothing but what kind friends give me in charity, while he lives in a hotel at Park Ridge, within a stone's throw of Emily Knibbs, with whom he spends his time and on whom he lavishes his salary as civil engineer. I have often rued the day when his fine form and shallow head lured me to this."
Miss Annie Shurfee said that Mrs. Hoare had only her house at Park Ridge and derived other necessaries for her maintenance from the lady neighbors. Mr. Bonomy, a resident of Park Ridge, said that Hoare admitted to him that he was the father of Emily Knibbs' child, and told him that he no longer cared for his wife.
Judge Baker heaved a deep sigh as he told the lawyer that Lizzie Lemure's was a sad story, and she might have a divorce.

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An extract form The Daily Interocean Newspaper, Chicago Il, 27 July 1888:

AN OPERA SINGER'S DIVORCE.
Mrs. Elizabeth Hoare, of Park Ridge, secured a decree of divorce yesterday, before
Judge Baker from her husband, Edward Hoare, civil engineer for the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Company at a salary of $125 a month. Mrs. Hoare said she was married to defendant Feb. 27, 1870, at Scarborough, England. About a year after the union they came to Chicago, and Mrs. Hoare obtained her husbands present position. There was one child, born in Milwaukee, which has since died. Mrs. Hoare testified that her husband was guilty of intimacy with Emily Knibbs, his 16-year-old niece, and that he had a child by her. On May 6th last he left his wife and went living with Miss Knibbs, and has since been contributing $40 a month toward the support of his niece and her child. All this time Mrs. Hoare has been on the brink of starvation while Hoare boards in style at Park Ridge Hotel. Complainant said she has been kindly cared for lately by Mrs. W.P. Black, and Captain Black appeared as attorney for Mrs. Hoare.
"I gave him no provocation for his conduct," said Mrs. Hoare. When I married him I had from $6,000 to $8,000. I took him to Paris with me. He was a soldier, and I gave him £31 to buy his discharge from the army. I gave him money and valuables, and I brought several thousand dollars to this country with me and spent it with him. Even the little fortune that my mother left me he refused to account for. The gold watch that he has got in his pocket now I gave him. It cost me $200. It was my handsome gold watch, and he exchanged it for another. When he left he took the furniture and all my little souvenirs that were made a present to me from some of the first artists in Europe. His niece is now staying with a friend of his, a man that is working in the same office, and they are walking and riding together, and I have never opened my lips from the time he left until this moment"
The decree also provides for the payment of $30 a month alimony.
Mrs. Hoare's maiden name was Lizzie Lemure. She was a London opera singer some twenty years ago, and a protege of Lord George Paget. As a friend of Ada Isaacs Menken, the Mazeppa of Astley's Theater, she frequently met the Prince or Wales. Hoare was a private of the British Army.

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The Sun (New York) reported the following on Friday. July 27, 1888:

HER FAITHLESS HUSBAND
He Transferred his Affections to his Wife's Niece.

CHICAGO, July 26, - Lizzie Lemure's life romance was told in Judge Baker's court this morning. Twenty years ago Lizzie Lemure was a London opera singer and a protégé of Lord George Paget. She fell in love with a private in the British army, Edward Hoare. A private soldier's pay made him susceptible to any woman of means, and Lizzie Lemure had $80,000. So, in 1870, Lizzie Lemure and Edward Hoare were married. The opera singer gave the soldier
$160 to buy his discharge from the army, but she affirms that he did not spend it for that purpose. He deserted from the ranks and came to Chicago. She followed him in six months. With her money a house was purchased at Park Ridge, and Mrs. Hoare's activity and energy procured her husband a position of civil engineer on the North Western Railroad, which position he has held for fourteen years. The couple's life was happy in Park Ridge until eight years ago.
In April, 1850, having no children, Mrs. Hoare brought over from England her 16-year-old niece, Emily Knibbs. Emily was not pretty, but she was young and vivacious. "She lived with Mr. Hoare and myself as one of the family." said Mrs. Hoare, "and for a long time I was far from suspecting that my husband could be so base as to betray her. It came like a peal of thunder out of a clear sky when Emily became the mother of a child. She tearfully told me who was the father. It was Mr. Hoare. I taxed him, and he confessed. I was so overcome that I became ill, and when I could do so I took a trip to California. On my return I found that Mr. Hoare and my niece were living together at my house. I ordered her out, and in a week Mr. Hoare left also. He told me that he did not love me any more. He said he was bound to provide for and protect Emily and his child. The brazen girl was ungrateful for all I had done for her. She took all my bric-a-brac and the hundred little articles I had collected in twenty years., but I never chided my husband for his infamy. I loved him very deeply."
"Did you give your husband any provocation for his treachery?" asked Mr. Hoare's lawyer.
"Provocation? Well, yes if you call taking him to Paris and spending £500 pounds on him in a month. If you call giving him all of my £2,000 which I made on the stage, and £650 left me by my mother in England two years ago - if you call that provocation, why, then I suppose I gave him provocation. I loved him passionately: I was as true to him as any woman is to any man. Everything I had he got. He has absorbed it all, and to-day, in the meridian of life, I find myself heartbroken, penniless, with nothing but what kind friends give me in charity, while he lives in a hotel at Park Ridge, within a stone's throw of Emily Knibbs, upon whom he lavishes his salary as a civil engineer. I have often rued the day when his fine form and shallow head lured me to this."
Judge Baker told the lady she might have the divorce she sought.

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From the Baltimore Sun, July 27, 1888:
A Sad Romance.—Twenty years ago Lizzie Lemure was a L ondon opera singer and a protege of Lord George Puget. A friend and contemporary of Ada Isaacs Monken, the famous Mazeppa of Ashley's Theatre, she frequently met the Prince of Wales. Lizzie married in 1870 a private of the British army, Edward Hoare. She had $80,000 and he had nothing but bis pay. Hoare deserted and went to Chicago. Mrs. Hoare’s energy procured for her husband the position of civil engineer on the North western Rail road, which position he has held for fourteen years. The couple’s life was commonplace but happy in Park Ridge until eight years ago. In April, 1880, not having been blessed with children,. Mrs. Hoare brought over from England her sfxteen-year-old niece, Emily Knibbs. Emily was not pretty, but she was young aud vivacious. Yesterday in court, in divorce proceedings. Mrs.Hoare charged her husband with betraying Emily and squandering his wife’s money. The divorce was granted.

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From the South Wales Echo, 13 August, 1888:
A LONDON ROMANCE
Twenty years ago Lizzie Lemure was an opera singer in London, the friend of Lord George Paget and Ada Isaacs Menken. She fell in love with Edward Hoare, a private in the British Army—tall, handsome, and intelligent. She had a fortune of £16,000; bought Hoare's discharge—she says that he deserted and stole the discharge money—and, in 1870, married him and emigrated to Chicago. Ten years brought them no children, and, in 1880, Mrs Hoare imported her niece, Emily Knibbs, sixteen years old, to live with them. One day Emily bad a baby, and confessed that Hoare was its father. Mrs Hoare left the house. On her return she found her husband and Emily living together as man and wife. Now she has sued for a divorce, which Judge Baker, of Chicago, has granted. Mrs Hoare says :—" I am heartbroken, penniless, and rue the day when that man's fine form and handsome head lured me from my profession and my country."

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Sadly, I've been unable to identify what happened to Elizabeth after her divorce from Edward.

Sources for Elizabeth KNIBBS:

  1. 1841 British Census,
  2. 1910 US Federal Census,
  3. Theatre Billboard,
  4. LDS IGI Records, as NIBBS 

Notes for Unknown HOARE:

The only reference we have to this child is from the divorce proceedings of Elizabeth and Edward where it is identified that they had a child, born in Milwaukee, but it had since died.

The only possiblity I've ever found was a child named Libbie Hore who was living with her mother, Lizzie Hore in 1880 in Wisconsin. They were living in the househild of Benjamin Garthwait and his wife Issabell. The only information is that Libby was born in Wisconsin and both her parents were born in England.