John Edward KNIBBS, son of Henry KNIBBS and Ann CROXFORD , was born bef. 27 July 1836 in Charlbury, Oxfordshire, England. He married Frances COLLINS 06 March 1859 in Charlbury, Oxfordshire, England. He died 30 March 1920 in King William's Town, Cape Province, South Africa. Frances COLLINS, daughter of Henry COLLINS and Ann HARRIS , was born bet. April and June, 1840 in Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire, England. She died 17 June 1918 in King William's Town, Cape Province, South Africa.


Children of John Edward KNIBBS and Frances COLLINS are:
1. Amy Caroline KNIBBS, b. bef. 23 March 1879
2. Henry Edward KNIBBS, b. 31 May 1861 See Henry Edward KNIBBS & Emily Newton WICKS
3. James KNIBBS, b. 22 January 1864 See James KNIBBS & Fanny May THOMPSON
4. John KNIBBS, b. 11 May 1868 See John KNIBBS & Jessie Ann SYMONS
5. Frances Mary KNIBBS, b. 20 March 1866 See Charles PLUMMER & Frances Mary KNIBBS OR Horace Bristow STORR & Frances Mary KNIBBS
6. Frank William KNIBBS, b. 18 February 1872
7. Robert Ernest KNIBBS, b. 31 July 1874 See Robert Ernest KNIBBS & Alice Emily NASH
8. Herbert KNIBBS, b. 09 January 1877 See Herbert KNIBBS & Julia Ellen COLE
9. Hilda May KNIBBS, b. 09 July 1889 See Oswald Hilton P BARRAUD & Hilda May KNIBBS
10. Alice Lucy KNIBBS, b. 01 May 1870
11. Hildred May KNIBBS, b. 01 November 1882

Marriage Notes for John Edward KNIBBS\Frances COLLINS:



John and Frances taken in the early 1900's (click to enlarge).
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Witnesses to the marriage were ?Jiba COX and Frances JOHNSON
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From the Cheltenham Chrinicle, Tuesday 15 March 1859:
Knibbs—Collins—March 6, at Charlbury, Mr. John Edward Knibbs, saddler, to Fsnny, daughter Mr. Henry Collins, of Moreton-in-Marsh.

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From the Worcester Chronicle. 23 March 1859:
MARRIED. March 6th, at Charlbury, by the Rev. S. H. Russell, vicar, Mr. John Edward Knibbs, saddler and harness maker, to Fanny, daughter of Mr. Henry Collins, of Moreton-in-Marsh.


Notes for John Edward KNIBBS:

John and Fanny emigrated to Soith Africa in 1859. They left Southampton on the Schah Jeham on 2 May and arrived at Algoa Bay on the 8 July. The Schah Jehan was the 9th Emigrant Ship to the Cape.

The passenger list shows:
Knibbs Fanny F 18 Married House Maid
Knibbs John Edward M Married Harness Maker

After John's name in "Other Information" is written the name of Mr. Wheeler, King William;'s Town who I'm guessing was John's contact there.
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1846-1852

The following information was passed to me by Natascha Hartlett from documents she has related to the NASH family:
Samuel John Nash (son of Rev. Samuel Nash), John Edward Knibbs, and Edward Coulter were friends (in England) and were sent to South Africa as soldiers either during 1846 or 1852 to fight in one of the kaffir wars of the Eastern Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. Upon their discharge from the army Samuel John Nash was allotted ground at Mount Coke near King William's Town. Edward Coulter farmed at Stonelands in the Komga district.John Edward Knibbs had a saddle making business in King William's Town.

Samuel John Nash married Jane Knibbs (sister of John Edward). Edward Coulter
married Lucy Nash (sister of Samuel John). John Edward Knibbs came from
Charlbury, Oxford, England and married Fanny Collins."...

From this, we think John Edward returned to England, got married, had some children and then came back to South Africa to settle for good.
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1883-1895

Information from the South African National Archives indicates that John Edward emigrated to South Africa, trading in the Cape Province supplying saddlery and suitcase between 1883 and 1895. He died in South Africa in1920 and the Archives show that his estate took 3 years to wind up. It's quite probably that his business (JE KNIBBS & SONS) complicated matters.
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1859

His daughter Amy Caroline was baptised at Charlbury, Oxfordshire, in 1879. The Archives show he was trading in South Africa in 1883. However, John Edward and his new wife Fanny of just 4 months, emigrated to South Africa in July 1859. They travelled on a ship named Shah Jehan with a "well-selected superior group of immigrants" according to the book 'Aided Immigration from Britain to South Africa 1857-1867' by Esmé Bull.
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The following article was found from the
Eastern Province Herald, July 12, 1859

Shah Jehan (sometimes spelled Schah Jehan)

On Friday last just as we were going to press we noticed in a hasty manner the arrival of the Shah Jehan, 757 tons, C, J. Cox, Commander, with Emigrants from Southampton.

She sailed on the 2nd May, and has had a fine passage of 67 days. The port Captain immediately went on board, but in consequence of a strong westerly breeze blowing at the time, she dropped anchor at a considerable distance from the shore and was therefore not visited by the Immigration authorities until the following morning when the Chairman of the Board, J Campbell, Esq. and the Secretary, Mr Longlands, went on board. They found "all well" and everything in beautiful order. The Shah Jehan is certainly the finest vessel that has yet been employed in the transport of emigrants to this colony. Her fittings are good and the ventilation secured is the most perfect that could be devised.

There have been three births but no deaths during the voyage. The emigrants seem a superior class of people, and their conduct on board ship is reported as having been orderly. They express themselves as well satisfied with their treatment during the passage, and speak highly of the accommodation of the vessel.

From the list of emigrants which we append, it will be seen that out of the number embarked (288 souls) a great many are permit cases who have been sent for by their friends. Most of these landed on Saturday and about 150 of the other immigrants. The remainder came on shore yesterday. Many of these have already met with engagements - a considerable number having determined upon proceeding to Graaff-Reinet.

We cordially welcome these new arrivals to this the country of their adoption, and feel satisfied if they only be honest, sober and industrious, they will never have cause to regret the step they have taken. A far better prospect is before them here than they could have at home.

The following is a correct list of immigrants by the Shah Jehan, showing their names, ages and occupations:

Knibbs; John Edward, 22, harness maker; Fanny, 18, housemaid
etc....
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The sailing ship Shah Jehan, 757 tons.

From the South African National Archives it can be seen that:
1883 - Known to be selling saddlery to the Northern Border Police
1895 - Known to be selling saddlery and equipment to Cape Police and Cape Mounted Rifles as JE KNIBBS & SON
1896 - Known to be selling suitcases as JE KNIBBS & SON
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1901

Interestingly, in 1901, John appears living at a property named Park Lodge, Egerton, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire in the UK with his wife Fanny and two younger daughters Hilda and Amy. I am told this was an affluent area of Cheltenham made up of Georgian houses, probably in Andover Road which is close to Montpelier Gardens and the Rotunda. Certainly at that time, the neighbouring houses all appeared to be occupied by people "living on their own means" and with house servants.
I believe from this information, we can consider that John Edward was a fairly wealthy man who travelled back and forth to his home country of England with his family, probably on several occasions.

We can see from the census that Amy was born in Cheltenham, but Hilda, the younger of the two was born in South Africa.

John Edward KNIBBS, 64, Saddler & Harness Maker Cape Colony, Oxon Charlbury
Fanny KNIBBS, 59, Glouces Moreton-in-Marsh
Amy KNIBBS, 22, Gloucs Cheltenham
Hilda KNIBBS, 18, South Africa
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See John's Death Notice


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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at the eGGSA Branch of The Genealogical Society of South African for recording the details on their web site in memory of John Edward and his wife Fanny.

John is buried at King William's Town main cemetery, South Africa.

Sources for John Edward KNIBBS:

  1. Oxfordshire Parish Register - Charlbury,
  2. 1851 British Census,
  3. John Edward's Death Notice (ref. MOOC 6.9.1672, no 1276),
  4. South African National Archives (NAAIRS),
  5. Headstone,
  6. 1901 British Census,

Notes for Frances COLLINS:

Also known as: Fanny

In 1841, Frances was living with her parents at Back Ends, Shipston On Stour, Moreton In Marsh, Gloucestershire:
Henry Collins 30 Labourer
Ann Collins 30
John Collins 6
William Collins 4
Frances Collins 1
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The family was still there in 1851:
Henry Collins Head Mar 44 Farm Labourer Worecestershire Paxford
Ann Collins Wife Mar 40 Gloucestershire Broadwell
John Collins Son 15 Farm Labourer Gloucestershire Moreton
William Collins Son 13 Farm Labourer Gloucestershire Moreton
Fanny Collins Daur 10 Scholar Gloucestershire Moreton
Joseph Collins Son 8 Scholar Gloucestershire Moreton
Sarah Collins Daur 5 Scholar Gloucestershire Moreton
Mary A Collins Daur 1 Gloucestershire Moreton
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Fanny's mother Ann can be seen as a widow in 1881 living at back of High Street, Moreton in Marsh, Gloucestershire, England:
Ann Collins Head Wid 70 Broadwell, Gloucester, England
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From the Oxfordshire Weekly News - 21 August 1918:
KNIBBS.—June 17. at 96, Alexandra Road. King William's Town, South Africa. Fanny (née Collins), beloved wife of J. E. Knibbs, aged 78.

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Fanny is buried at King William's Town main cemetery.

Sources for Frances COLLINS:

  1. Oxfordshire Parish Register - Charlbury,
  2. 1901 British Census,
  3. Ancestry.com, England & Wales, Birth Index: 1837-1983 gave Shipston on Stour District 
  4. John Edward's Death Notice (ref. MOOC 6.9.1672, no 1276),
  5. Headstone,
  6. Newspaper Article,
  7. eGGSA, Genealogical Society of South Africa,

Notes for Amy Caroline KNIBBS:

Also known as: Maimie

John Edward Knibbs' death notice indicates that Amy Caroline was unmarried (aged 41 years) when he died in 1920. It appears that she remained a spinster all of her life.

Amy's Death Notice is on file at MOOC 193500006/9/4625 ref: 46230 at the Cape Archives.


See Amy's Death Notice

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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at the eGGSA Branch of The Genealogical Society of South African for recording the details on their web site in memory of Amy Caroline.

Amy is buried at King William's Town main cemetery.

Sources for Amy Caroline KNIBBS:

  1. Oxfordshire Parish Register - Charlbury,
  2. GRO England & Wales, GRO England & Wales gives 1qtr1879 
  3. South African National Archives (NAAIRS),
  4. Cape Archives Death Notice, index confirms year of death 
  5. Headstone,
  6. eGGSA, Genealogical Society of South Africa,

Notes for Frank William KNIBBS:

Frank was present at the death of his brother James in 1922.

Frank's Death Notice is on file at MOOC 194300006/9/9955 ref: 85004 at the Cape Archives.
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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at the eGGSA Branch of The Genealogical Society of South African for recording the details on their web site in memory of Frank.

Sources for Frank William KNIBBS:

  1. John Edward's Death Notice (ref. MOOC 6.9.1672, no 1276),
  2. Personal Contact with Natasha Hartlett-Von Aulock,
  3. LDS - South Africa, Methodist Parish Registers, 1822-1996,
  4. South African National Archives (NAAIRS),
  5. Cape Archives Death Notice, index confirms his year of death 
  6. Personal Contact with Alan C Paterson,
  7. eGGSA, Genealogical Society of South Africa,
  8. LDS - South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers,

Notes for Alice Lucy KNIBBS:

We only know of Alice Knibbs being another daughter from the transcript of John Edward's death notice. We don't know where or when she was born. She is simply listed amongst the children as Alice Knibbs Deceased.

Sources for Alice Lucy KNIBBS:

  1. John Edward's Death Notice (ref. MOOC 6.9.1672, no 1276),
  2. LDS - South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers,

Notes for Hildred May KNIBBS: