Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY was born 18 February 1849 in Prussia. He married Isabel J KNIBBS 12 June 1889 in Niagara, New York, USA. He died 09 December 1946 in San Diego County, California, USA. Isabel J KNIBBS, daughter of Isaac KNIBBS and Phoebe AVERY , was born abt. 1857 in Niagara Falls, New York, USA. She died 30 December 1902 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA.


Children of Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY and Isabel J KNIBBS are:
1. Inez Dolores H BOGALSKY, b. 24 November 1892

Marriage/Union Events for Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY\Isabel J KNIBBS:

Marriage Notes for Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY\Isabel J KNIBBS:

From The Niagara Falls MY Gazette,June 1889:
The marriage of Mr. T. 0. H. Bogalsky of Tucson, Arizona, to Miss Belle Knibbs of this village was celebrated at the rectory of St. Peter's church by Rev. Geo. F. Rosenmuller on Wednesday Iast, June 12. Mr. and Mrs. Bogalsky started that evening for a short trip east, returning a day or so since.
Mr. Bogalsky will remain here for a few days and then depart for Arizona. Mrs. BogalsIty and hermother, Mrs. I. Knibbs will join him in Tucson in about a month.

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From the Los Angeles Herald, May 26, 1893:
Divorce proceedings were begun by Belle J. Bojalsky vs. Tony O.H. Bogalsky.

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From the Los Angeles Herald, Friday June 23, 1893:
THAT MOTHER-IN-LAW.
MR. BOG ALSKYCH ARGES HER WITH HIS MATRIMONIAL TROUBLES,
Her Nlbbs and Her Daughter and the Keyhole—The Women Carry the Day and the Defendant Was Convicted.
A divorce suit, an unprepared breakfast and a mother-in-law with her eye perpetually glued to the keyhole, are the excuses Mr. Tony Bogalsky, the livery stable proprietor of Broadway, gives for his matrimonial troubles.
Mr. Bogalsky appeared before Justice Seaman yesterday in answer to a complaint sworn to by Belle Bogalsky, his wife, who alleges that on the 11th day of June her husband seized her by the throat and choked her.
Mrs. Bogalsky stated that some time ago she instituted proceedings for divorce, which she afterwards withdrew n ber husband promising to abstain from illtreatlng her. Since then he has perpetually been threatening and abusing her.
On the day of the aesault she was in the dining room holding her baby when her husband came up and began using bad language about the breakfast. He then took her by the throat and nearly choked her, she dropped the baby, and he let her go. Mrs. Nibbs, mother of the complainant corroborated her daughter's statement.
The defendant then went upon the stand and denied the allegation. He stated that he placed a warning hand upon her shoulder, and was about to tell her not to use unladylike language when she screamed and her mother came in. The witness then stated that his mother-in-law was the cause of the whole trouble, she was perpetually
listening at the keyhole.
Thie statement was energetically denied by Mrs. Nibbs and her daughter.
Justice Seaman found the defendant guilty of battery and he was ordered to appear for sentence this morning.

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The following is from the Los Angeles Herald, 21 October, 1902:
Divorce Suits.
Bettie J. Bogalsky has been granted a divorce from T. O. H. Bogalsky.

A suit for divorce was filed yesterday by Tony O. H. Bogalsky against Marie L. Bogalsky. He alleges that she wanted to run the household and when he protested she tried to poison him.

Other Marriages/Unions for Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY:
See Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY & Marie Louise HANDLIN OR Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY & Jessie GRIBBLE


Notes for Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY:

In 1890, we see Tony registering to vote from 229 South Workman, Los Angeles, California. He gave his place of birth as Germany.
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On 12 Sep 1890, we see Tony registering to vote from 833 S Broadway, Los Angeles, California. He gave his place of birth as Germany.
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There are many advertisements in the Los Angeles Herald between 1892 and 1894 featuring the Anchor Stables for which Tony was the proprietor. One example is as follows:
Anchor Stable.
The Broadway livery stable has removed from 428 South Broadway, to 342 South Bpring street, where the proprietor will be .ready to Berve his customers in the best possible manner. Thanking tbe public for the past liberal pationsge be asks a continutnee of the same liberality. T. O. H Bogalsky, proprietor of the Anchor stables, 342 South Spring

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From the Los Angeles Herald, 23 June 1893:
THAT MOTHER-IN-LAW.
MR.. BOGALSKY CH ARGES HER WITH HIS MATRIMONIAL TROUBLES.
Her Nlbbs and Her Daughter and the Keyhole—The Women Carry the Day and the Defendant Was Convicted.
A divorce suit, an unprepared breakfast and a mother-in-law with her eye perpetually glued to the keyhole, are the excuses Mr. Tony Bogalsky, the livery stable proprietor of Broadway, gives for his matrimonial troubles. Mr. Bogalsky appeared before Justice Seaman yesterday in answer to a complaint sworn to by Belle Bogalsky, hia wife, who alleges that on the11th day of June her husband seized her by the throat and choked her. Mrs. Bogalsky stated that some time ago she instituted proceedings for divorce, which she afterwards withdrew on her husband promising to abstain from illtreatlng her. Since then he has perpetually been threatening and abusing her. On the day of the assault she was in the dining room holding her baby when her husband came up and began using bad language about the breakfast. He then took her by the throat and nearly choked her, she dropped the baby, and he let her go. Mrs. Nibbs, mother of the complainant corroborated hsr daughter's statement. The defendant then went upon the stand and denied the allegation. He stated that he placed a warning hand upon her shoulder, and was about to tell her not to use unladylike language when she screamed and her mother came in. The witness then stated that his mother-in-law was the cause of the whole trouble, she was perpetually listening at the keyhole. The statement was energetically denied by Mrs. Nibbs and her daughter. Justice Seaman found the defendant guilty of battery and he was ordered to appear for sentence this morning.
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From The Los Angeles Herald, Sunday August 12th, 1894:
Anchor Stables.
The Broadway livery stable has removed from 428 South Haraway, to 342 south Spring street, where the proprietor will be ready to serve his customers in the best possible manner. Thanking the public for the past liberal patronage he asks a continuance of the same liberality. T. O. H. Bogalsky, proprietor of the
Anchor stables, 342 South Spring.

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On 8 June, 1896, we see Tony registering to vote from 922 Denver Ave, Los Angeles, California. He gave his place of birth as Germany.
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From the Los Angeles Herald, July 13th, 1896:
LIVERY STABLE ABLAZE
A Row of Shed Stalls Consumed With But Little Loss.
Night Watchman Walter Houston at 9:30 last evening discovered that the rear portion of the Niagara livery stable at Nos. 303 and 305 East Third street was afire. He turned in an alarm as quickly as possible from the corner of Third and Main streets, but before the engines arrived the flames had gained considerable headway.
The premises at the number given are owned by M. Saunders and occupied by T. O. H. Bogalsky as a livery, feed and sale barn. The main building in front was not touched, but the flames consumed a row of shed stalls in the back yard, ln these stalls were some eighteen horses, but they were all gotten out in safety, and only a little hay was consumed.
It Is stated that the blaze originated In the extreme rear of the premises next door on the east, No. 307. run as the Enterprise harness shop by C. H. Strong. Mr. Strong had stored there about four tons of hay, and it is supposed that tramps sleeping in it carelessly dropped a lighted match or burning tobacco. The fire spread to the west and south with great rapidity, but was confined to the shed stalls.
There will be a loss of 134 to Mr. Strong and perhaps $250 on the sheds burned, all
insured.

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From the Los Angeles Herald, Tuesday April 27th, 1897:
QUEEN'S LANCERS
Enjoy a Banquet Given by the Fiesta Committee
At the request of La Reina Franclsea, a banquet was tendered to the Queen's Lancers last night at Jerry Illich's by the executive committee of the Fiesta President Ferd. K. Rule presided, and Prime Minister Thomas, Major Harry Pattorr and Captain Solano of Troop D were present as guests. An excellent menu was served, and the affair was
greatly enjoyed.
A letter was read from Queen Francisca thanking the gallant lancers for their loyalty and kindness while in her service. A characteristic letter was also read from the little floral queen.
A toast, "The Queen." was drunk standing, and was responded to by Captain Solano, Lieutenant Thompson. Lieutenant Howland, Lieutenant Nord holt and F. J. Thomas. The toast, "The American Flag," was proposed by Sergeant Bogalsky, and a toast to President McKinley was proposed by Mr. Thomas. A toast to the little floral queen was also drunk.
Sergeant Fenner, the musical spirit of the troop, enlivened the occasion by several songs, and Bugler Kurtz gave the different bugle calls. The revelers disbanded at a late hour, after having spent an enjoyable evening.

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We know that Tony fought n the Amerecan-Spanish war in 1898, and received an Invalid Pension from the army.
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From the Los Angeles Herald, 19 November 1898:
EVENTS AT CAMP PRATT
Program for the Exhibition Drill on Thanksgiving
The last of the physical examinations of the Seventh regiment will take place today. Then will follow the making out of the rosters, accounting tor company property and filling in data for each of the 1260 men on blanks furnished by the war department. When this work is completed the reports will be turned over to Colonel Berry, who will present them to Captain Pratt, the mustering out officer. Should this task be completed next week, the Seventh will be mustered out by Nov. 28th. A flag pole seventy five feet high has been presented to the regiment by Major J. Henry Dockweiler of General Last's staff. The gift is much appreciated, and with due ceremony the pole will be erected between the hotel and the horticultural building. Old Glory will hereafter float over Camp Pratt. The football team of the First battalion is in active practice for its game with the U. S. C. team.
Sergeant Bogalsky, Company F, has been appointed deputy clerk tor the purpose of registering all men of the regiment who have not been registered before. There are probably 150 of these, who will thus be enabled to vote at the coming municipal election.

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In 1900, we see Tony and Isabel living at Precinct 74a/74b, Los Angeles, California:
Tony O H Bogalsky Head Mar 49 Poultry Keeper Prussia
Belle J Bogalsky Wife Mar (12 years) 4 New York
Inez Dola H Bogalsky Daur 7 California
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From The Salt Lake tribune., October 06, 1904:
CHANGES OF TWENTY YEARS
Visitor Describes Salt Lake as It Ap-peared to Him in 1880.
After an absence of more than twenty-four years, T. O. H. Bogalsky of Los Angeles, Cal., returned to Salt Lake last night, and is loud In his praises of the city. "I left here when there were no paved streets and no electric cars" said Mr. Bogalsky. "I lived here from 1878 until July, 1880, when I left and went to Mexico. From there I went to Arizona, and in 1889 I went to Los Angeles. In 1897 I sold out and went to the Philippines, "When I was here there was a street car line, with one street car, drawn by a team of mules and driven by a man named Dunn. This ran out to Fort Douglas. There was a stone fence around President Taylor's house, and cows were pastured In the streets. The Clift House was at the edge of town, and the business streets of the town were Main and South Temple. There were very few houses beyond Main streeet at that time. "Gen. Smith was in command at Fort Douglas, and had the Fourteenth regiment under him. "From what I have seen of your city now I think It Is the most wonderful city in the world. I have visited many, but the broad, well-paved streets and the method of placing the trolley poles in the middle of the streets should commend itself to every one."

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In 1930, we see Tony with his third wife Jessie living at Portland, Multnomah, Oregan:
Tony O H Bogalsky Head Mar 75 Poland
Jessie Bogalsky Wife Mar 39 Utah
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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at Find A Grave web site for recording the details, in memory of Tony.

Sources for Tony Oscar Herbet BOGALSKY:

  1. 1900 US Federal Census,
  2. Ancestry,com - California Death Index, 1940-1997,
  3. Newspaper Article,

Notes for Isabel J KNIBBS:

Also known as: Bella or Bell or Bettie

From the Los Angeles Herald, Saturday July 24th, 1897:
The estate of Leonard Norman Knibbs.
The petition of Bell J. Bogalsky that she be appointed guardian. The estate consists of $542 now ready to be paid over to a properly appointed person.


Leonard was her nephew, orphaned at the age of 4 years.
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From The Los Angeles Herald, Sunday November 28, 1897:
Children's Party
Mrs. B. Bogalsky of Denver avenue entertained a number of children on Wednesday afternoon ln celebration of the fifth birthday of her daughter Lola. Mmes. Codori and J. Knibbs assisted. Arend's orchestra furnished music during the afternoon, and games and dancing were followed by a luncheon, for which Christopher catered. The table was decorated with roses and smilax. A delightful series of kindergarten games was led by Miss Ella Fawble. Those present were: Sophia Sweet, Josephine Lacy, Rosamond Jones, Marie Northrup. Elizabeth Hancock, Edith Elser, Julian Cohn, Katie Pierson, Mary Anderson, Mine Hutchinson, Nita Codori, Jean Graham, Alice Chapman, Pearl Harper, Irene Howard, Lucille Hellman, Rlffa Kinney, Brownie Coulter.

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The following appeared in the Los Angeles Herald, 30 June, 1898:
SHELTER TENTS WANTED
Capt. Steere's Bequest—The Young Sisters of the Red Cross Capt. Henry Steere of Battery D writes the Red Cross society in reply to a letter that he is provided with sleeping caps and bandages for all his men and has received from Col. Berry 200 cholera bandages, but would like 200 more, that the men may have the necessary change. They are supplied with eiderdown caps but would prefer those of lighter weight, and suggested large bandana handkerchiefs for a head covering, as they can also be used for many other purposes. Shelter tents are not an article of government issue at present, and Capt. Steere is solicitous about the comfort and health of his men compelled to eat outdoors In the rainy climate of the Philippine islands. "If our Los Angeles friends," he writes, will supply us with four 12x14 tents, called in the army 'hospital tents,' no doubt considerable sickness could be prevented." The Red Cross state association, through Its chief of supplies, Mrs. K. M. McKistry, acknowledges the receipt of another box of supplies from the Los Angeles division. Little Miss Sallie Plater McFarland gave a "fair" for the benefit of the Red Cross, and has turned In the proceeds, $29.7 in pennies and nickles. Miss Marian Adler, aged 5 weeks, is the youngest member of the society thus far. The total membership up to date numbers 330. Mrs. Belle Bogalsky donates six bandages, four pillowcases and literature. The headquarters' workers were the recipients again yesterday of a large jar of lemonade from Secretary Wiggins of the chamber of commerce. New members: Mmes. Elsie L. Hanerlck, Henry T. Lee, B. C. Whitlock, M. S. Hellman, Mary K. Viven, J. E. Plater, Alfred Stern, John R. Haynes, Misses A. Bradfield, Margaret Lee, Mary Lee, Adele Schwareschibl, Carrie Waddllove, Gwendolln Overton, Sallie Plater McFarland, Stephen N. Loew.


This conflict arose when the First Philippine Republic objected to the terms of the Treaty of Paris under which the United States took possession of the Philippines from Spain, ending the Spanish–American War.
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The following article appeared in the Los Angeles Herald, on Saturday July 15, 1899:
Mrs. Belle J. Bogalsky petitioned the superior court for letters of guardianship of her nephews George and Charles Knibbs, residents of Niagara Falls, New York, whose father is dead and who have property in this county.


George and Charles were the sons of Isabel's brother Charles A Knibbs and his wife Annie Gallagher. Charles died in September 1885, and Annie in October 1885.

As far as I'm aware, Charles was adopted by Jacob Barthau and his wife Catherine (Gallagher) Barthau. the mother's sister. He can be seen living with them in 1892 as an adopted son.
George on the other hand. may well have been taken into care. I think it's him we see living as an inmate of No.29 Franklin Street, Buffalo City, New York. 29 Franklin Street was connected with the Children's Aid Society and known as 'the News-Boys' and Boot-Blacks' Home' up until 1908. It was for boys who earned their own living from work on the streets.
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From the Los Angeles Herald, 2 October 1901:
AWARDS MADE AT POULTRY SHOW
Judge Decides the Points of Chickens
Exhibitors From Many Portions of This Section of the State Receive Proper Recognition for Their Hlghly-Bred Feathered Beauties

S. Tyler, the judge of poultry of the Sixth District Agricultural fair, yesterday made the following awards: Entries by Mrs. B. J. Bogalsky; Light Brahmas —First for cock and hen; second for hen and pullet; no competition. Partridge Cochins—First for hen, cockerel and pullet; second for hen and pullet. Black Lanshans—First for cock and cockerel; second for hen and pullet. Buff Plymouth Rocks—First for cockerel and pullet; second for pullet. Buff Leghorns—First for pullet; second for cockerel and pullet. White Minorcas— First for cockerel. Black Mlnorcas —First for cock, hen, cockerel and pullet; second for cockerel and pullet. Andalusians— First for cock, hen, cockerel and pullet; second for hen and pullet. No competion. Polish—First for cock, hen, cockerel and pullet; second for cock, hen and pullet. Houdans—First for cock, hen, cockerel and pullet; second for cockerel and pullet. Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds —Second for pullet. Best pair Pekin ducks—First and second; no competition. Best pair Fantail pigeons— First; no competition. Japanese Silkies, special 03—First and second; no competition.

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From the Niagara Falls Gazette, 20 January, 1903:
Mrs. T.O.H. Bogalsky, formerly Miss Belle Knibbs, this city, dies in Los Angeles.

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From the Niagara Falls Gazette, 21 January, 1903:
Obituary
Mrs T.H. Bobalsky
Mrs. EdwardE. Mealus of Niagara Street receoived word yesterday from the Pacific Coast announcing the death om December 30th of Mrs. T.O.H. Bogalsky formerly Miss Belle Knibbs of this city.
Deceased resided in Los Angeles, Cal. and leaves a husband and one daughter.
Buffalo papers please copy.

Sources for Isabel J KNIBBS:

  1. 1880 US Federal Census,

Notes for Inez Dolores H BOGALSKY:

Also known as: Dolores or Delores or Lola

From The Los Angeles Herald, November 25th, 1892:
BOGALSKY - To the wife of T.O.H. Bogalsky, November 24th, 1892, at 7 p.m., a girl.

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From the Los Angeles Herald, 30 March, 1902:
First Easter Eggs
By Dolores Bogalsky, Class C, Age 9 Years. On Easter morning I get up very early and go out to look for the eggs layed by the Easter rabbit. I always find some under the rose bushes, and all kinds of out of the way places. Once I had a little rabbit named Jet. I kept him in a little coop. One day I could not find him and have never seen him since, but the next Easter I found a beautiful silvery colored egg in the coop where I had kept my little Jet. There is a pretty legend about the first Easter eggs. A little white dove had her nest near the tomb where our dear Savior lay. She was sitting on her nest Easter morning brooding over her pretty white eggs, when angels rolled away the stone from the door of the tomb and Jesus came forth. This little dove was the only one to see the wonderful sight, and when she left her nest soon after she found her eggs were changed to blue and gold, and those were the first colored Easter eggs.

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From the Los Angeles Herald, 30 March, 1902:
Stories by the Young Folks
Prizes for Young Writers
The Herald offers weekly prizes for stories written by Its young readers, as follows: For the best story not exceeding four hundred words, written by a girl or boy between 13 and 16 years, $2.00.
The same proposition, ages 10 to I3, $2.00.
Best story by writer under 10, not more than two hundred words, $1.00.
The class division—A, B, C— is Intended to writers or different ages an equal chance.
Stories that are not printed will be corrected and returned to writers If return postage Is enclosed.
The full address and age of the writer must always be given. All such communications should be plainly addressed to The Herald, and marked "Youths' Department."
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Helen Pitner, Los Angeles, Class A $2.00
Ernest Ganahl, Los Angeles, Class B $2.00
Dolores Bogalsky, Los Angeles, Class C $1.00

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From the Los Angeles Herald, 20 Apr, 1902:
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Los Angeles, Cal., April 7, 1902. Editor Youths' Department: Accept my thanks for the prize money and for the nice letter that came with it. Success to The Herald, and to Its kind editor. Very truly yours, DOLORES BOGALSKY. 1185 East Thirty-sixth street.

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Dolores graduated from Crocker Grammar School, San Francicso in January, 1908.
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In 1910, we see who I believe is Inez under the name of Dolores, living at San Jose Township, Santa Clara Co8nty, California:
George B Hayes Head Mar 40 Orchardist Illinois
Flora A Hayes Wife Mar 40 New York
George W Baker Step Father-in-Law Mar 64 New York
Ella M Baker Mother-in-Law Mar 64 New York
Dolores Bogalsky Boarder 17 California
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Inez, or Dolores which seems to have been her preferred name, married a man named Ben Dison on 17 Jan 1914 at Stanislaus, California. They had a daughter named Bertha B Dison born on 17 November, 1914 at Stanislaus, California.
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Inez died less than 2 months later of meningitis at the age of 22.
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From the Mariposa Gazette, 23 January 1915:
News of the death of Mrs. Ben Dison has been received here. This news comes as a shock to her friends in this county and sincere regret is felt for her untimely end. Mrs. Dison was a most estimable young woman who numbered her friends by her acquaintances. She and Mr. Dison lived on the Hammond and Bates ranch until a few months ago, when they moved to Turlock where they have since resided. She leaves a little daughter only a few weeks old. Mr. Dison has the sympathy of the entire community.

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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at Find A Grave web site for recording the details, in memory of Dolores.

Sources for Inez Dolores H BOGALSKY:

  1. 1900 US Federal Census,
  2. Newspaper Article,
  3. LDS - California Death Index, 1905-1939,