Edward KNIBBS, son of Henry KNIBBS and Rosannah DIMMICK , was born 09 April 1876 in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. He died bet. July and September, 1964 in Uxbridge District, Middlesex, England. Mary Ann WORRALL was born 12 July 1874 in Dudley District, Staffordshire, England. She died bet. October and December, 1939 in Brentford District, Middlesex, England.


Children of Edward KNIBBS and Mary Ann WORRALL are:
1. Hannah KNIBBS, b. bet. April and June, 1900
2. Ada KNIBBS, b. 13 July 1901
3. Edward KNIBBS, b. 07 December 1902

Marriage/Union Events for Edward KNIBBS\Mary Ann WORRALL:

Marriage Notes for Edward KNIBBS\Mary Ann WORRALL:

Edward and Mar were not married.

Other Marriages/Unions for Mary Ann WORRALL:
See John KINGSTON & Mary Ann WORRALL


Notes for Edward KNIBBS:



Edward's dad, third from the left, with his five sons (from left to rigjht) Thomas, Henry, William, Edward and James Arthur. (click to enlarge)
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I'm pretty sure that Edward Knibbs and Mary Ann Kingston were partners, but have found no evidence yet that they were married. They had three children. Mary was previously married to a man named John Kingston but it seems she left him to live with Edward Knibbs quite soon after she married him in 1896. There were no children from her marriage to John Kingston.
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The baptism record for their daughter Ada gives their home address as the canal boat "Ouse".
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From the Northamptonshire Mercury, Friday 16 October, 1903:
SHOCKING DEATHS AT BRAUNSTON
TWO CHILDREN SUFFOCATED
PARENTS CENSURED
An inquest was held at the Plough Inn, on Thursday, before the Divisional Coroner, Mr, C. H. Davis, touching the deaths of Hannah Knibbs, aged 3½ years, and Ada Knibbs, aged 2 years 9 months, who were suffocated in the cabin of a boat at Braunston on Tuesday.
The first witness called was Edward Knibbs, who said he was the father of the children, whom he last saw alive just before nine o’clock on Tuesday night. They were alright then and in good health. The had one other child, aged 9 months, which was with its mother. He went back to the boat at eleven o’clock. Mary Ann Kingstone was the mother of the children. They lived together, but she was not his wife. The mother went in the boat with him and her brother Joshua James Worrell. The top side of the barge was open about three-parts of a foot. Worrell was the first to enter the cabin, followed by witness. The two children were taken out and taken to a house, and the doctor sent for. The children were insured. He saw nothing burning when he entered the cabin, but the cabin was full of smoke.
Mary Ann Kingstone, who seemed much affected, said she was the wife of John Kingstone, who is still alive. She had lived with Knibbs seven years. The were no children by the first husband. She last saw the children alive abut half past five on Tuesday when she gave them tea, and her brother took them to her sister’s in the wharf. She did not see them again until they were taken from the boat. Knibbs and Worrell were then there. Worrell went into the boat first and came out and shouted there is a lot of smoke in the cabin, and then fetched out one of the children. Ted said, “Joss, which one have you got.” Joss said, “Hannah.” Knibbs then fetched out the younger one. As they were going from the goat to the house they met Mr. Bushell, who went for the doctor. They then met Mrs. Hares.
Joshua James Worrall said he last saw the children alive about half past eight on Tuesday night, when he took them to their father to go to bed. The father put them to bed. The witness left the boat about nine o’clock. The boat was alright then and no sign of fire. Witness went to the boat again at eleven o’clock with his sister and Knibbs. Witness went into the boat first and found the cabin full of smoke. He opened it and fetched out the oldest child, and the father the youngest. He could not say if they were alive. He did not see anything burning in the cabin. –
By a juryman: Was there a dog in the cabin. –
Witness: Yes. –
The juror: Is the dog all right and well. –
Witness: It is not right yet. It ran out of the cabin when they went in.
Dr. John Terry, of Braunston, said about five minutes to twelve, when he saw the children, they were lifeless. He tried artificial respiration for just over an hour, assisted by W. Bushell and the father, but without avail. There was a great smell of burning, but no marks or burns on the children. He had no hesitation saying that death was due to asphyxia in each case, and was probably cause by smoke from some burning matter. –
By the Coroner: The children were well nourished and healthy looking children.
P.C. Walter Sismey, stationed at Braunston, said he examine the boat, and found it in a suffocating condition. After an examination he saw where the cabin had been on fire. He picked up a quantity of burnt material, which was lying between the cooking-stove and the cabin back, which appeared to be the commencement of the fire. The lamp was then out, but was full of oil. It did not seem to be caused by the lamp at all. The condition of the cabin inside appeared as though the fire had been smouldering some time. This concluded the evidence, and after a short interval the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death, cause from suffocation, but there was agreed neglect on the part of the father and the mother.” The father was called in and censured by the Coroner.

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From the Ballymena Observer October 23, 1903:
Two Children Suffocated.
Two little girl;s, daughters of a Birmingham Bargeman, Edward Knibbs, have been suffocated in the bed on a barge at Braunston, Northamptonshire. The barge arrived at Braunston that evening, and was moored for the night. The father and mother both went into the village to make purchase, leaving their two children, Hannah, aged 4 and Ada aged 3, asleep in a berth in the cabin, which served as the living room of the family. There was no-one else on the barge. On their return the children were both dead, having evidently died in their sleep, and all efforts at resuscitation were futile. There was smoke in the cabin, but no trace of fire, except in the little stove, which had been left burning by the parents. It is supposed that the wind blew smoke and fumes down the chimney into the cabin,


From the Northamptonshire Mercury, Friday 23 October, 1903:
THE BRAUNSTON TRAGEDY
FUNERAL OF THE VICTIMS
The remains of the two little girls, Hannah and Ada Knibbs, who were suffocated in a boat on the canal at Braunston last week, were laid to rest in All Saints' Churchyard, Braunston, on Saturday afternoon. They were interred near to the grave of their grandmother, Mrs. Knibbs. The bearers were eight young women of the village. A large number of the villagers gathered at the churchyard to pay a last token of respect to the little creatures who came to such an untimely end. Both the coffins were covered with wreaths and crosses from sympathising friends and playmates.
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From the Northampton Mercury - Friday 23 October 1903:
The Braunston Tragedy.
Funeral of the victims.
The remains of the two little girls, Hannah and Ada Knibbs, who were suffocated in a boat on the canal at Braunston last week, were laid to rest in All Saints' Churchyard, Braunston, on Saturday afternoon. They were interred near to the grave of their grandmother, Mrs Knibbs. The bearers were eight young women of the village. A large number of the villagers gathered at the churchyard to pay a last token of respect to the little creatures who came to such an untimely end. Both the coffins were covered with wreaths and crosses from synpathising friends and playmates.
We see Edward, Mary, son Edward and grandson Denis living in the Brentford and Chiswick District of London at the time of the 1939 Register.
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We see Edward and Mary, together with their grandson Thomas Knibbs, living at 279 High Street, Brentford and Chiswick, Middlesex, at the time of the 1939 Register.

Sources for Edward KNIBBS:

  1. 1881 British Census,
  2. Ancestry.com, England & Wales, Birth Index: 1837-1983 gave Daventry District 
  3. 1939 Register,
  4. GRO England & Wales,
  5. 1911 British Census,

Notes for Mary Ann WORRALL:

Also known as: Mary Ann Worrell
  • Birth: 12 July 1874 in Dudley District, Staffordshire, England.
  • Death: bet. October and December, 1939 in Brentford District, Middlesex, England.
  • Occupation: Barge Masters Wife  1881 

I suspect it was this Mary who was born at Dudley District, based on her age given at her death. Her death was registered as Mary A Knibbs, aged 65.

I suspect her parents were Charles and Mary Ann Worrell and we see them in 1871, living at Haywood Great Wharf, Colwich, Stafford, Staffordshire:
Charles Worrell Head Mar 57 Captain of Canal Boat Kidderminster Worcestershire
Mary Ann Worrell Wife 47 Worcester Worcestershire
Samuel Worrell Son UnM 17 Canal Boat Man Bedworth Worcestershire
Joshua Worrell Son UnM 9 Stoke Staffordshire
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Her brother Joshua can be seen in 1881 living at Narrow Boats Tunnel Top "Sam", Dutton, Cheshire, and I suspect this is the home of his mother, remarried to Joseph Davies.
Joseph Davies Head Mar 56 Barge Master Wooden Basset Wiltshire
Mary A Davies Wife Mar 57 Barge Masters Wife Worcester Worcester
Caroline Davies Dau UnM 19 Barge Masters Dau Wolverhampton Stafford
Joshua Warrell Other Unm 19 Barge Mate Stoke On Trent Stafford
Eliza Davies Other 11 Wales
William T Davies Other 9 Wolverhampton Stafford
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Mary's brother Joshua went on to marry a girl named Mary Ann Hughes in q2/1884 at Dudley District, Staffordshire. In 1891, we see him living at 8 Wickstones Hill, Runcorn, Cheshire:
Joshua Worrall Head Mar 29 Labourer Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Mary Ann Worrall Wife Mar 25 Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Mathew Worrall Son 6 Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Charley Worrall Son 3 Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Mary J Worrall Daur 1 Cheshire Runcorn
Joseph Stephens Boarder Mar 56 Labourer Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Emmy Stephens Boarder Mar 55 Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Joseph Stephens Boarder 21 Labourer Staffordshire Brierly Hill
Jeremiah Stephens Boarder 16 Labourer Staffordshire Brierly Hill
John Haggack Boarder 38 Labourer Kent
Thomas Bird Adopted Son 1 Lancashire Warrington
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We see Mary's brother Joshua in 1901, living at 20 Crofton Street, Warrington, Lancashire:
Joshua Worrell Head Mar 38 Coal Heaver Staffs Stoke
Mary Ann Worrell Wife 36 Staffs Brierly Hill
Matthew Worrell Son 17 Crane Driver Staffs Brierly Hill
Charles Worrell Son 12 Staffs Brierly Hill
Mary J Worrell Daur 10 Cheshire Runcorn
Jeremia Worrell Son 10 Cheshire Runcorn
Joshua Worrell Son 7 Lancs Manchester
Samuel Worrell Son 5 Lancs Manchester
Joseph Worrell Son 3 Lancs Manchester
Richard Worrell Son 1 Lancs Salford

Sources for Mary Ann WORRALL:

  1. 1939 Register,
  2. GRO England & Wales,
  3. 1881 British Census,

Notes for Hannah KNIBBS:

  • Birth: bet. April and June, 1900 in Brentford District, Middlesex, England.
  • Death: 13 October 1903 in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England .
  • Burial: 17 October 1903  Braunston, Northamptonshire, England 

Hannah's death was recorded under the name of Hannah Kingstone, in Daventry District.
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See Hannah's Burial Registration

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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at Find A Grave web site for recording the details, in memory of Hannah.

Sources for Hannah KNIBBS:

  1. GRO England & Wales,
  2. Newspaper Article,

Notes for Ada KNIBBS:

  • Birth: 13 July 1901 in Foleshill District, Warwickshire, England.
  • Death: 13 October 1903 in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England .
  • Baptism: 28 July 1901  New Brentford, Middlesex, England 
  • Burial: 17 October 1903  Braunston, Northamptonshire, England 

Ada's death was recorded under the name of Ada Kingstone, in Daventry District.
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See Ada's Burial Registration

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Our gratitude goes to the members and volunteers at Find A Grave web site for recording the details, in memory of Ada.

Sources for Ada KNIBBS:

  1. GRO England & Wales, gave date 
  2. Alan Jackson,